CJN 219

CJN-219A  Rhetoric of Protest & Reform D207 

Fall 2015

Examines the persuasive strategies of social reform movements with special emphasis on the civil rights', women's rights, and gay rights movements in the United States. 

Dr. Gloria M. Boone

Ridgeway 405
Communication and Journalism
Suffolk University
Boston, MA 02108

Office Hours: T TH 10:30-11:30,
and by appt.

Phone: 617-573-8501
Fax: 617-742-6982
gboone@suffolk.edu

Required Text:

Boone, G. (2007) American Social Movements for Freedom: Abolition, Suffrage, Civil Rights and Women's Rights. (online book)

Other readings will be assigned from the Internet, journals, or newspapers. 

This is a multimedia course. A variety of clips from documentaries, films and television will be shown.

Protest and Reform Class- http://infoacrs.com/r/class2.html PLEASE USE THIS LINK TO OPEN ANY READING. SOMETIMES BLACKBOARD LINKS DO NOT WORK.

Freedom Book Index- http://infoacrs.com/r/freedomindex.html

Related Links- http://infoacrs.com/r/links.html

 

Course Goals & Learning Objectives for SCGP

GOALS

OBJECTIVES

ASSESSMENTS

Upon successful completion of this course, students will:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

How the student will be assessed on these learning objectives:

Understand the mechanisms through which social, cultural or global differences are perceived, understood and constructed

Identify the differences related to the area of study in their historical or geographical context
To provide an understanding of the important speeches, essays and messages of African-Americans. To provide an understanding of the important speeches, essays and messages of women in America.

Include the specific assignments and activities that students will complete in this particular course
The midterm and the final ask questions about important speeches and messages of African-Americans and women in American society.

 

Compare different standpoints and perspectives about diverse communities.
To understand the persuasive strategies used in social movements such as abolition, civil rights, suffrage and women's rights.

The Midterm and the final ask about the social movement strategies used in abolition, civil rights, suffrage and women’s rights.

 

Explain how differences are constructed or reinforced.
To understand the persuasive strategies used in social movements such as abolition, civil rights, suffrage and women's rights.

The class discussion and the individual papers determine if the persuasive strategies are discovered and analyzed.

Understand the relationships among conflicts, social, cultural or global differences, and power within the changing historical and cultural contexts

Understand how some specific issues involving conflict and power evolved in historical or cultural context.
To enable the critical examination of issues like slavery, discrimination, inequality, race, gender, and power in American society.

The midterm and the final ask questions about slavery, discrimination and inequality in society.

 

Explain how privilege and power play a systemic role in how culture is practiced.
To enable the critical examination of issues like slavery, discrimination, inequality, race, gender, and power in American society.

A rhetorical criticism paper allows the student to examine responses to slavery, discrimination, inequality, race, gender and power.

 

Have self-knowledge about how different perspectives are active and impactful in your (the student’s) life

The class discussion allow for self -knowledge and reflection about race and gender.

Analyze how convergent or conflicting perspectives of diverse communities influence change within a social, cultural or global context

Analyze concepts and constructs taught in class.
To compare and contrast different leaders, audiences and rhetorical strategies used in social movements. To analyze how freedom and civil rights have evolved and expanded in America.

A rhetorical criticism paper allows the student to examine responses to slavery, discrimination, inequality, race, gender and power by different social leaders.

 

Review and analyze implications of research in order to apply course content to real classroom/institutional scenarios.
To compare and contrast different leaders, audiences and rhetorical strategies used in social movements. To analyze how freedom and civil rights have evolved and expanded in America.

A rhetorical criticism paper allows the student to examine responses to slavery, discrimination, inequality, race, gender and power by different social leaders.
The final asks students to explain the evolution of freedom and civil rights in the United States.

 

 

Day Topic or Activity
9/10-15

Introduction to the course.
Slavery in the AmericasSlavery today

Discussion due on 9/15 (10 points)

9/17 Introduction to Social MovementsRhetorical Analysis
9/22 Work day to select topics for reports
9/24-29

Olaudah Equiano, Middle Passage, Bitzer- Rhetorical Situation

Quiz on 9/29 (10 points)

10/1-6

Declaration of Independence, Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin BannekerKenneth Burke

Slavery in Colonial America -  Slave Revolts-New York in 1741, David Walker

Walker Report

Topic for first report outline with 5 sources due on 10/6 (10 points)

10/8 Women's lives - Mary WollstonecraftPhillis Wheatley

Early America - Colonial America
Arguments over origins, ownership, history, religion, nature, gender, and civilizatio
10/13

Life in Colonial and Antebellum America: Landowners, Women, Servants, Free men, and Slaves.

Slave revolts-Nat Turner
Free Black Communities-Maria Stewart, Richard Allen

Abolitionists: Sarah and Angelina Grimke, Sojourner Truth, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Tubman

Descendents of Africa, Sons of 1776: Exploring Early African-American Rhetoric. By: Bacon, Jacqueline; McClish, Glen. RSQ: Rhetoric Society Quarterly, Winter 2006, Vol. 36 Issue 1, p1-29http://0-search.ebscohost.com.library.law.suffolk.edu:80/login.aspx?direct=true&db=ufh&AN=23925085&site=ehost-live
10/15

Seneca Falls - Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Lucretia Mott
Early attempts at Suffrage-Susan B. Anthony

10/20

 Suffrage video

10/22

Discussion due on 10/22 (10 points)

Dred Scott Case, John Brown, Civil War-Northern views, Civil War -Southern views, Abraham Lincoln

Confederate ideas , State's Rights and John C. Calhoun, Role of Literature

Civil War Amendments (13th, 14th, 15th), Reconstruction, Black Codes, Political Action, KKK, the Black Press, Plessy v. Ferguson

10/27

AMSA, Lucy Stone, Henry Blackwell, Victoria Woodhall, court cases, Wyoming and the West

Suffrage Renaissance, Carrie Catt, Anna Howard Shaw, Jane Addams, Alice Paul, Women's Peace Movement, Picketing the White House, 19th Amendment

Mixing of issues-Frances Willard (WTCU), Race, Class, Gender, Margaret Sanger

Discursive Identity Formation of Suffrage Women: Reframing the “Cult of True Womanhood” Through Song. By: Hurner, Sheryl. Western Journal of Communication, Jul2006, Vol. 70 Issue 3, p234-260 Persistent link to this record: http://0-search.ebscohost.com.library.law.suffolk.edu:80/login.aspx?direct=true&db=ufh&AN=23220256&site=ehost-live  database: Communication & Mass Media Complete

 

10/29 Midterm

11/3

 

Pick topics for 2nd report (10 points)

 

 

11/5 Ida B.Wells, Mary Church Terrell, Jim Crow

Booker T. WashingtonW.E.B. DuBois
11/10

NAACP, Marcus Garvey, Alain Locke, Claude McKay, Langston Hughes, Jean Toomer, Countee Cullen, Zora Neale HurstonThe 1940's- 1950's-Joe Lewis, Truman Executive Order (1948)

Brown v. Board of Education, Eleanor Roosevelt, Rosie the Riveter, Motherhood in the 1950's, Betty Freidan, Simone de Beauvoir

Discussion due on 11/10 (10 points)

11/12-17 Rosa Parks, Martin Luther King, Jr., James Baldwin, Fannie Lou Hammer, Civil Rights Act of 1964

DOING TIME: KING'S "LETTER FROM BIRMINGHAM JAIL". By: Berry, Edward. Rhetoric & Public Affairs, Spring2005, Vol. 8 Issue 1, p109-131 http://0-search.ebscohost.com.library.law.suffolk.edu:80/login.aspx?direct=true&db=ufh&AN=17749616&site=ehost-live

SCOFFING AT THE ENEMY: The Burlesque Frame in the Rhetoric of Ralph David Abernathy. By: Selby, Gary Steven. Southern Communication Journal, Winter2005, Vol. 70 Issue 2, p134-145  http://0-search.ebscohost.com.library.law.suffolk.edu:80/login.aspx?direct=true&db=ufh&AN=18712084&site=ehost-live
11/19-24 Gloria Steinem, Equal Rights Amendment 1972, Title IX 1972, Roe v. Wade 1973, Phyllis Schlafly

THE CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN ABORTION CONTROVERSY: STAGES IN THE ARGUMENT. By: Railsback, Celeste Condit. Quarterly Journal of Speech, Nov84, Vol. 70 Issue 4, p410, 15p http://0-search.ebscohost.com.library.law.suffolk.edu:80/login.aspx?direct=true&db=ufh&AN=9936973&site=ehost-live

Quiz on 11/19 (10 points)

11/26 Thanksgiving Day Holiday
12/1-3 Malcolm X video Malcolm XBallot or Bullet, Black Panther Party
 

The Evolution of a Revolution: Stokely Carmichael and the Rhetoric of Black Power. By: Stewart, Charles J.. Quarterly Journal of Speech, Nov97, Vol. 83 Issue 4, p429, 18p http://0-search.ebscohost.com.library.law.suffolk.edu:80/login.aspx?direct=true&db=ufh&AN=9711214808&site=ehost-live

12/8

 

Writers, Poets, and Music-Civil Rights Songs, Rap, Alice Walker, Maya Angelou, Rape, Domestic Violence, Feminists, Feminist Backlash, Black Identity, Recent Race and Gender Issues.

REPRESENTING THE THIRD WAVE: MAINSTREAM PRINT MEDIA FRAMING OF A NEW FEMINIST MOVEMENT. By: Bronstein, Carolyn. Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Winter2005, Vol. 82 Issue 4, p783-803 http://0-search.ebscohost.com.library.law.suffolk.edu:80/login.aspx?direct=true&db=ufh&AN=20486632&site=ehost-live

Reconceptualizing Rhetorical Activism in Contemporary Feminist Contexts. By: Sowards, Stacey K.; Renegar, Valerie. Howard Journal of Communications, Jan-Mar2006, Vol. 17 Issue 1, p57-74. http://0-search.ebscohost.com.library.law.suffolk.edu:80/login.aspx?direct=true&db=ufh&AN=19701793&site=ehost-live Database: Communication & Mass Media Complete

12/10 Final due

Requirements:

Midterm (100 points)

Final (100 points)

Report #1 is a 3-4 page typed rhetorical analysis/oral report/powerpoint of a reformer up until 1921. At least cite five sources. The oral reports will be scheduled for each person from 10/8 until 10/27. (100 points)

Report #2 is a 3-4 page rhetorical analysis/oral report/powerpoint of a reformer after 1922. At least cite five sources. The oral reports will be scheduled for each person from 11/5 until 12/8. (100 points)

Class Participation and Attendance (30 points)

Discussions and Quizzes (70 points)

TOTAL (500 points)

 

 General notes:

  1. I use yourSuffolk email and blackboard to notify you of class changes. Please sign up and check both systems.
  2. ALL papers must be typed. Both content and style will be graded.
  3. Sources must be cited using APA style in papers or take-home tests.
  4. EVERTHING SHOULD BE TURNED IN ON BLACKBOARD under the appropriate assignment.
  5. Use the APA guidelines in formatting any paper.
  6. For papers, websites, discussions, blogs, or powerpoints you expected to cite sources by hyperlinking to the source or putting the source in the code. This will be explained in detail in the class.
  7. Assignments must be handed in ON TIME. A late penalty will be applied of one full grade.
  8. You are expected to attend class. If you miss more than three classes your grade will be reduced. If you are experiencing some emergency you should contact the Student Affairs Office at 73 Tremont on the 12th floor. Phone 617-573-8239.
  9. This course follows the Federal Government's Credit Hour definition: For every hour in the classroom you are expected to spend at least two hours reading, researching and completing assignments and homework. It is anticipated that you will spend about 180 hours of work (in and out of class) to complete this four credit course.
  10. Academic dishonesty is morally repugnant. Cheating on examinations, plagiarism and/or improper acknowledgment of sources in essays or research papers, and the use of a single essay or paper in more than one course, without the permission of the instructor, constitute unacceptable academic conduct. Student work may be checked by plagiarism detection software. Academic dishonesty will be reported to the Office of Student Affairs. Reports will be addressed through the Student Discipline System. An undergraduate student who has been found to have violated this policy is subject to an automatic grade of "F" in the course and to suspension, enforced withdrawal, or dismissal from the University or appropriate lesser penalties if warranted by the circumstances. Read the Academic Honest Policy.
  11. Incompletes are given ONLY if you have a valid reason that you discuss with the instructor.
  12. Disability Statement: If you anticipate issues related to the format or requirements of this course, please meet with me. I would like us to discuss ways to ensure your full participation in the course. If you determine that formal, disability-related accommodations are necessary, it is very important that you be registered with the Office of Disability Services (located in 73 Tremont St., 7th floor, 617-994-6820) and notify me of your eligibility for reasonable accommodations. We can then plan how best to coordinate your accommodations.
  13. As a student, you may experience a range of issues that can cause barriers to learning, such as strained relationships, increased anxiety, health issues, alcohol/drug problems, feeling down, difficulty concentrating, lack of motivation, or feeling ill. These concerns or other stressful events may lead to diminished academic performance or may reduce your ability to participate in daily activities. Suffolk University services are available to assist you in addressing these and other concerns you may be experiencing. You can learn more about the broad range of medical services and confidential mental health services available on campus at the following websites:Counseling Center http://www.suffolk.edu/offices/989.html,
    Office of Health and Wellness Services
    http://www.suffolk.edu/offices/932.html
  14. Important dates established by Suffolk University:
    9/29 is the last day students can withdraw from a course without receiving a grade of W. The course will be completely removed from the student's transcript. Students may do this online via MySuffolk.

    11/5 is the last day students can withdraw from a course without receiving a grade of F. They will receive a W on their transcript instead. Students may do this online via MySuffolk.

    After 11/5, students may not withdraw from courses unless they have serious extenuating circumstances and documentation. Students should email the Student Affairs Office to request a late course withdrawal.
  15. Grading:

    A 93 % ; A- 90 % ; B 87 %; B 84 %; B- 80 %; C 77 %; C 74 %; C- 70 %; D 67 %; D 64 %; D- 60 %; F below 60% 

  16. Do Not use your cell phone, text, or social media during class without instructor permission.

  17. For other Suffolk University class information check here.

    Gloria M. Boone © 2015